Scott & Aplin LLC
Your Family's Law Firm

Criminal Law

Photo by hatman12/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by hatman12/iStock / Getty Images

Criminal Law

As part of Scott & Aplin LLC's focus on family related issues, often times clients are confronted with unfortunate circumstances and find themselves facing infractions, misdemeanors or felony charges.  At Scott & Aplin our experienced attorneys can assist our clients in resolving criminal charges in the following ways:

  • Work with you and the prosecutor to negotiate a "deal." These deals, also known as "plea bargains" can often reduce your potential sentence or eliminate some or all of the charges brought against you. 
  • Figure out a good sentencing program for your situation. In the event that you are found guilty, your criminal defense attorney may be able to work your sentence in a way that would prevent you from winding back up in the criminal justice system. 
  • Help you with the emotions that often go along with criminal trials. Defendants in criminal prosecutions often feel embarrassed, depressed, and fearful and can also suffer from low self-esteem.
  • Provide you with a reality check. Defense lawyers often know what is going on much better than you will during your criminal trial. 
  • Point out important legal rules and regulations that you would most likely never find on your own. Many rules and laws about criminal prosecutions are buried within regulations and laws, and even prior court opinions.
  • Navigate your case through the state legal system where your case is being heard. In addition to written rules, such as the local rules of court, that must be obeyed and followed, there are often many "unwritten rules" that go along with each jurisdiction. 
  • Explain about some of the "hidden costs" that come along with pleading guilty. Many people that represent themselves never think about the consequences of pleading guilty if it could lead to a shorter sentence. 
  • Be able to spend more time and effort on a case than a defendant that chose to represent himself (after all, it is the attorney's job to represent you!).
  • Be able to more easily gather evidence and statements from witnesses that are going to be called by the prosecution.